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Archive for January 2nd, 2008

A friend suggested I give a listen to this singer/songwriter from Australia. This song, “Don’t Ever,” is just one of many beautifully written and performed songs out there. I’ll be looking more up on iTunes soon.

Lyrics:

Let’s take a train to anywhere
I want to feel the wind in my hair with you
Let’s tell them all that soon they’ll know
How very wrong they were to think we’d never go

And if you tell me yours I’ll tell you mine
And we will clean the cobwebs out of one anothers’ minds
Don’t ever say you tried to leave me in this life
Don’t ever say you tried for the last time

We’ll get a house where the trees hang low
And pretty little flowers on our windowsill will grow
We’ll make friends with the milkman
And the butcher Mr. Timms will give us discounts when he can

And if you tell me yours I’ll tell you mine
And we will clean the cobwebs out of one anothers’ minds
Don’t ever say you tried to leave me in this life
Don’t ever say you tried for the last time

la di da di da la di da di da la di da di da di da di da

Don’t ever say you tried to leave me in this life
Don’t ever say you tried to leave me in this life
Don’t ever say you tried for the last time

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Bloggers Unite!  If you’re going to write for the public domain, please attempt to use proper grammar (unless your style is to ignore grammar rules intentionally). I’m known to break a few rules myself (not always on purpose), but there’s one obvious rule that seems to be obliterated by even the most poetic of published writers. It’s become my latest peeve:

A) An organization (workplace, restaurant, school, etc.)  is an “it” not a “they,” and

B) People are “who” not “that.”

Some examples as reference…

WRONG: “The nonprofit organization announced they will offer a new literacy program.”

RIGHT: “The nonprofit organization announced it will offer a new literacy program.”

Since most organization have several (maybe thousands) of people, it’s easy to make this mistake. But companies are always its, not theys.

When it comes to people (friends, family, co-workers, and others) always use who, not that.

WRONG:  “My friends that showed up at the party were all drunk.”

RIGHT:  “My friends who showed up…”

If everyone who reads this will take notice of these common maladies when writing, the world will be a better place – at least for handful of people reading this blog and those whom I love to read in return!

-end-

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